Job in computational genomics in Madrid

The Computational Evolutionary Genomics group at CBGP (Madrid, Spain) is seeking for outstanding and motivated postdocs to join the Computational Systems Biology and Genomics Program (CSBGP).

Potential research lines include:

1) Novel enzyme discovery out of massive metagenomics data using phylogenomic, structural and genomic methods. Metagenomic sequences from multiple microbiome sources (e.g. ocean, gut, soil, etc) lacking functional annotation will be analyzed. Bioinformatic pipelines will be developed to study phylogenetic, syntenic and structural similarities of novel sequences, as well as to infer predictions that can be integrated into metabolic modeling tools.

2) Evolution of gene function in plants and microbial organisms. Functional innovations and their ancestral origins will be investigated taking advantage of newly sequenced genomes, transcriptomes and soil/ocean metagenomes. We aim at combining genomic and metagenomic data to trace the gain, loss and evolutionary divergence of functional modules across the whole tree of life. We are also interested in studying functional profiles as ecological or host-associated signatures.

Applications: http://compgenomics.org/jobs/

Postdoctoral Research Assistant in Host-microbe Interactions

Our colleague, Kayla King offers a post-docposition in the King Lab at the University of Oxford, Department of Zoology to work on host-microbiome-pathogen interactions.


The postholder will use transcriptomics to examine whether and how protective bacteria can alter real-time and evolutionary defences of Caenorhabditis elegans nematode hosts to infection by parasites. Commensal microbes can have therapeutic and prophylactic powers. This project will identify candidate innate immune genes/pathways affected by the protective bacteria and pathogen in our system, and importantly, establishing a role for the microbiome in shaping the evolution of host defences against opportunistic pathogens.


The closing date for applications is 12.00 noon on Friday 18 May 2018.

More information here

Postdoctoral position in Cancer Metabolism

Our colleague Bruno Galy offers a postdoc position in the field of ‘Cancer Metabolism’ to work at the ‘Virus-associated carcinogenesis’ division in the DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany.


One major interest of the Galy lab is iron metabolism. Iron is a trace element important for a plethora of cellular functions and like other metabolic pathways, iron homeostatic mechanisms are frequently altered in cancer. Using a combination of biochemical and molecular biology assays together with state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art mouse models and organoid cultures, the candidate will study the function of central regulatory systems of iron homeostasis in various aspects of tumorigenesis, with a strong focus on hepatic and intestinal cancer. The successful applicant will more specifically investigate the impact of local iron mismanagement in cancerous cells versus cells of the tumor microenvironment on the inflammatory processes that lead to carcinoma formation.


To inquire about the position, the job profile, and the conditions, contact Dr. Bruno Galy.